Byron Bay Ceramicist Jules Hunt

Oh Byron Bay, the mecca for soul searchers, sun seekers and surfers – how I love you so… Yes, I am on holiday at the most eastern tip of Australia and bring this blog post to you with a frangipani in my hair and a skip in my step. Your intrepid art reporter undertook the artist trail in the Art and Industry Park about three kilometres from town where there are over 22 studios and galleries to visit. It was here I stumbled upon ceramicist, Jules Hunt, working in her studio.

To create her signature ceramic works, Hunt hand-casts using earthenware clay. She is well-known for her intricately patterned platters which she creates using a slip-trail technique (like icing a cake). She glazes the colours individually to create artworks that are rich in detail.

“My bright, colourful patterns are inspired by organic forms in nature, geometry, and of course colour,” she says “And any variation in the design is due to each piece being individually handcrafted.”

Hunt also creates ornamental pieces such as tea-light lanterns and lights. These are crafted in earthenware clay onto which she carves a pattern. When dry she adds texture and fires it, before hand glazing and firing again. The smooth, creamy matt finish is very elegant and beckons to be touched.

Her background is in graphic design and photography having studied at the University of Western Sydney. Her carvings and patterns are developed freehand and gradually build upon themselves until a pattern emerges. She is constantly exploring new designs across various mediums, including painting, to create a style that is distinctively her own.

And you don’t need to travel to Bryon Bay to see her work. In June 2011, Hunt will be exhibiting in Mt Eliza at Manyung Gallery, as well as in Sydney, Gold Coast and Melbourne. We just need to coax her to Geelong. You can find out more about Jules Hunt’s work on her website www.juleshunt.com

Thanks to Jules Hunt for allowing me to reproduce the following images of her work.


Jules Hunt at work in her studio.
 

Ah Byron Bay, the mecca for soul searchers, sun seekers and surfers – how I love you so… Yes, I am on holiday at the most eastern tip of Australia and bring this blog post to you with frangipanis in my hair and a skip in my step. High on the Byron Bay vibe, I undertook the artist trail in the Art and Industry Park about 3 km out from town and stumbled upon ceramicist, Jules Hunt, who was working in her studio.

 

To create her signature ceramic works, Hunt hand-casts using earthenware clay. She is well known for her intricately patterned platters which she creates using a slip-trail technique (like icing a cake). She glazes the colours individually to create artworks that are rich in detail.

“My bright, colourful patterns are inspired by nature and geometry, and of course colour,” she says “And any variation in the design is due to each piece being individually handcrafted.”

Hunt also creates ornamental pieces such as tealight lanterns and lights. These are elegantly handcrafted in earthenware clay out of which she carves a pattern. When dry she adds texture and fires it, before hand glazing and firing again. The smooth creamy matt finish is very appealing and beckons to be touched.

Ah Byron Bay, the mecca for soul searchers, sun seekers and surfers – how I love you so… Yes, I am on holiday at the most eastern tip of Australia and bring this blog post to you with frangipanis in my hair and a skip in my step. High on the Byron Bay vibe, I undertook the artist trail in the Art and Industry Park about 3 km out from town and stumbled upon ceramicist, Jules Hunt, who was working in her studio.

To create her signature ceramic works, Hunt hand-casts using earthenware clay. She is well known for her intricately patterned platters which she creates using a slip-trail technique (like icing a cake). She glazes the colours individually to create artworks that are rich in detail.

“My bright, colourful patterns are inspired by nature and geometry, and of course colour,” she says “And any variation in the design is due to each piece being individually handcrafted.”

Hunt also creates ornamental pieces such as tealight lanterns and lights. These are elegantly handcrafted in earthenware clay out of which she carves a pattern. When dry she adds texture and fires it, before hand glazing and firing again. The smooth creamy matt finish is very appealing and beckons to be touched.

Her background is in graphic design and photography having studied at the University of Western Sydney. Her carvings and patterns are developed freehand and gradually build upon themselves until a pattern  emerges. Restoring order from chaos is a recurring theme in Hunt’s work. She is constantly exploring new designs across various mediums, including painting, to create a style that is as unique and vibrant as Byron Bay itself.

In June, Hunt will be exhibiting in Mt Eliza on the other side of Port Phillip Bay. You can find out more about Jules Hunt’s work on her website www.juleshunt.com

Her background is in graphic design and photography having studied at the University of Western Sydney. Her carvings and patterns are developed freehand and gradually build upon themselves until a pattern  emerges. Restoring order from chaos is a recurring theme in Hunt’s work. She is constantly exploring new designs across various mediums, including painting, to create a style that is as unique and vibrant as Byron Bay itself.

In June, Hunt will be exhibiting in Mt Eliza on the other side of Port Phillip Bay. You can find out more about Jules Hunt’s work on her website www.juleshunt.com

 

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